“Kodakery” with a No. 1 Pocket Kodak Junior c. 1921

This Studio 2 Class (PH2300 at College of Dupage, taught by Peter Bosy) assignment was “Specular/Diffused” and the goal was to take a series of images where the camera and object did not move, but the lighting changed to bring out different details in the object. I chose to use a No. 1 Pocket Kodak Junior c. 1921 for my object. The first try had camera movement and focus issues. But the second session worked!

The images below are a composite of seven different lighting images, plus seven different colored gels images.Using masks on Photoshop, the best characteristics of each image were selected to make the composite image.

I found the manual on Orphan Cameras, courtesy of M. Butkus, and I was pleased to make a donation so I could have all the information needed to actually use this camera. A friend gave me two rolls of 120 50 ISO black and white film and she will help me develop them. Figuring out the exposures will be fun, as this camera does not use our current terms or options. ;-).

I can choose 1/25, 1/50. T or B for shutter speeds. I can choose 1, 2, 3, or 4 for my lens opening. And focusing is movement of the lens on the camera bed, with a very stiff bellow. But I’m excited to try and will share any success I have on a future blog post.

A few other technical notes: The manual talks about “Kodakery” and reads like a photography textbook. This camera was designed to put cameras into the hands of the people, a marketing plan of Kodak that we are all thankful for today. But Kodak had to teach the people how to use this camera! The manual mentions “Meniscus Achromatic” which is a lens configuration that reduces aberration and increase aperture, and according to an internet search, will likely produce blurry images. There were a number of “Pocket Junior” models, and this one seems to be an early one. By 1927, the Pocket Junior were using the f-stops we are familiar with today. 

Can you tell I had fun with this assignment?

Fall Color at the Arboretum

Bright yellow maple leaves greeted us today at Morton Arboretum. These images were captured mostly in East Woods where maple trees abound. It was late afternoon, with sunshine being overtaken by clouds. Everywhere we looked there was yellow, bright yellow. I love the East Woods! (A few Impressionist images are included!)

Sunrise – Fog – Lake

The fog was heavy this morning in northern Michigan. The first view looked like the horizon was at infinity. Then the sun briefly peaked out and reflected off the water. Then the clouds covered the sun. An hour later, the fog had burned off the lake, but the other side was still vague. The clouds started taking shape on the horizon when the fog lifted.

A Few Spring Flowers

The wind and clod and snow did not destroy all the Spring Flowers! As I walked around my backyard today to see what survived. The Scilla, Daffodils, Glory in the Snow, Windflowers and Blood Root are beautiful. I am promised a very large crop of Bluebells looking at the buds.  The Trout Lily and Celosia Poppy are filling the ground with green. Not many leaves on the trees yet. But maybe we’ve turned the corner from Winter.

“Sprinter” – When Spring is Overtaken by Winter

Spring is messed up in the Midwest this year. The plants thought Spring arrived a few weeks ago, but then Winter came back. So daffodils are bowing down from the cold, scilla are closing their petals in the cold, and muddy wet soil is frozen in places. This is not a good sign for spring flowers blooming in abundance!

My Mom and Grandma always said there had to be a snow on the yellow flowers before winter was over. I think we qualify today.